Tag Archives: 0905

Blizz kids

The blizzard has been unrelenting. It blew all night but the morning was full of promise with a hopeful sun peeking through the cloud. But an hour after kick-off a black ball swept across from the SW and before long we were in a snow dome. All visibility had gone, again. I am so accustomed to skiing blind that any kind of resolution on the horizon seems like such a luxury. Wind forecast to continue tomorrow but easing Sunday. Hallelujah!

A good surface mostly and we claimed 10km from the ocean, but camped next to a lead that we were too exhausted to find a way across.

Pic of my sled – Josephine – with Bernice and Martin approaching.

Eric

NAO

The feverish temperature rise in the Arctic has puzzled scientists: The most up-to-date climate models, such as those in the fifth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, fail to reproduce the rapid warming seen in the Arctic.
Researchers see a link between tropical sea-surface temperatures and the North Atlantic Oscillation, a climate pattern that dominates Arctic weather. Since the 1990s, warm sea-surface temperatures in the western Pacific and cool waters in the eastern Pacific have pushed the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) into a pattern that allows high pressure above Greenland and the Canadian Arctic. (High atmospheric pressure leads to warmer temperatures.) The NAO was in a negative fase in march and april hence the violent storm and cold weather we were experiencing in April and we are now again since the last 12 days in another cycle of west winds (drifting again to the east) and lots of snowfall. With predominant high pressure systems in the Arctic, storms usually come and go but we notice that they linger and come with lots of wind and moisture.

Definitely a better day although we skied in zero visibility all day. Not sure if you get used to it or we have forgotten what sunshine was all about. Goggles, face masks, hats, and many layers in the frigid blasting winds today, a classic north pole day. Hit the 200 km mark – if we are not drifting back tonight (4 km to the east last night).

jumping a lead

We were forewarned by the Canadian Ice Survey that there would be many leads developing due to this relentless storm we are having. Day 8 now of no visibility, extreme winds, and snow. It is rare to snow this much in the Arctic as well as these incredible length of storm cycles. At the end of the day, we got stopped once again by a lead. To our north we saw a dark cloud hanging over the horizon, indicating open water and to our south, one big lake. The new leads that are developing are running east- west so on our way south we cross many of those new leads.The last one of today around 6 pm provided us with a real challenge. It was under pressure and just like plate tectonics through friction, ice blocks and rubble will start to move, collide and crumble or pile up. In awe we stood on top of this ridge and watched the other side go by, or was it our side? This movement is all caused by the strong southwest winds we are experiencing for the last week. In the lead itself emerged a massive ice block that rotated when it came in contact with water. Because there was no snow attached to it it must have come from the deep abyss of the ocean. What a spectacle it was. Now we could see hoe tons of ice ends on top of a ridge.by it simply getting pushed up there by power and with the next pressure, it may fall in the lead and disappear in the arctic. It was also our only chance to cross to the other side and we have to be very quick to operate on moving ice. We dragged the sleds across first and then we jumped from the moving ice to another shore that was slowly moving. It felt like jumping from a moving train to another.
Perhaps not the safest we bave done so far but it was our only choice. “And then there is tea” Martin said as we skied away to find a place to camp.

Toying with a behemoth

The wind was gusting at 40km/h from the south west, buffeting us as we skied across the pack ice. A good start straight out of camp, the surface hardening slightly from the wind and sastrugi almost aligned with our direction of travel. Spindrift over the ice in the early sun was sublime.

Swam a snow-filled lead, island hopped over another and in the late afternoon crossed a huge fractured and lead-ridden zone by clambering over a giant pressure ridge as it was being born. Two thick plates were grinding into each other and we watched as boulders the size of caravans were calved, uplifted, submerged, overturned and stacked. Phenomenal power, and we chose to dice with it. Timing our run to perfection we hauled arse and sled to the other side as the configuration of boulders below us changed every second. A trapped foot would have upped the ante!

As we camped we heard the plane going to fetch Eric and Ryan. Happy boys I bet,

Pic of camp. Still windy, still snowing. We haven’t seen more than an hour of blue sky for over a week.

Eric